Posts Tagged ‘new school’

How to stay healthy with back to school germs

Written by trishfms on . Posted in healthy eating, healthy living, home owner, Kids, New School, Parent

staying-healthy-new-school-year-fl-move

It’s Back To School Time… which means GERM Season is back!

Yes, end of Summer is here, which means settling back into the comfortable routine of days marked by the ringing of school bells. It also means cold and flu season lurking just around the corner. Every parent dreads their child getting sick when school starts, even if it’s “just” a cold.

At best, you have a child not feeling well, not eating or sleeping well-a child missing school and parents missing work. At worst, a cold occasionally develops into something more, requiring a visit to the doctor and medical attention. What’s an overworked, sleep-deprived parent to do? Especially if they can’t afford to miss work? Well, here are some facts and practical tips to help keep your family healthy this cold and flu season.

Colds and flu are caused by viruses, not bacteria. Viruses are one type of germ that infects cells and makes us ill. Here are some common illnesses from viruses:

  • Head cold: Many colds are caused by rhinoviruses. Rhino means nose in Greek, so these are viruses that infect the nose. We get runny and stuffy noses when we have colds because that is where the virus is setting up shop.
  • Stomach flu: Rhinoviruses are actually one of a group of viruses called enteroviruses. Entero means intestine in Greek. These viruses infect our gastrointestinal tract, causing sore throat, nausea, vomiting or diarrhea-an illness some people call the stomach flu.
  • Influenza: A stomach “bug” is different from the actual flu, which is caused by the influenza virus. Influenza comes from the Italian word for influence of the stars. In medieval Europe, people thought outbreaks of colds and flu were caused by the movement of the stars.
Unlike bacterial infections, which can be treated with antibiotics, there are no medicines we can take to kill the viruses that cause colds and flu. We have to rely on our immune systems to do that job for us.

Avoiding Infection:

  • Hand Washing frequently with soap and water-and always before eating, after using the restroom and after being in a public place. Regular soap is fine; antibacterial soap isn’t necessary because colds are caused by viruses not bacteria.
  • Avoid sharing food, drinks, utensils, washcloths, toys, etc.
  • Cough or sneeze in a tissue or the crook of the elbow instead of the bare hand.
  • It is recommend if a child has a fever they can return to school 24 hours after fever has broken. Please do not send your child to school with a fever.
  • Give your child a box of tissue to keep in their desk/cubby as well as keep a box of tissue at your desk.
  • Use Hand Sanitizer
Cold and flu viruses are not airborne. You can’t catch a cold just by being in the same room as someone who’s sick.

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Preparing your child for a new School

Written by trishfms on . Posted in central florida moving, Cross Country Moving Company, healthy living, home owner, Kids, move, moving advise, moving out of state, moving tips, moving to new state, New School, Parent

new school All of us at Florida Moving Systems, Inc, know it’s hard for children when you move and they have to start a new school.  If you’ve recently moved your kids to a different school district or city, their transition is going to be made more challenging as they start a new school year. There are few things scarier than facing an entire classroom of new people, especially if they haven’t yet had time to adjust to their surroundings at home.

The best way to help your children transition is to start early. Take a few weeks before school starts up to give your kids an opportunity to meet new people and prepare for the upcoming year.

1. Arrange for a tour.

Most schools are happy to meet with new parents and students to walk you through the facilities. Make this appointment away from regular class hours so your child can familiarize him or herself with the school and ask any (potentially) embarrassing questions about the upcoming year.

2. Ask for a handbook.

Every school has a handbook of sorts—a guide to class hours, holidays, extracurricular activities, and school policies. Get your hands on one of these and read through it. Look for activities or events your child might enjoy and highlight the positive in these. You can also look for sports teams outside the school.

3. Get out in the community.

During the summer, community events for kids tend to be everywhere. Day camps, street fairs, public swimming pools, block parties—you might be unsure at the idea of getting out there and meeting people already, but it’s a good time to make the effort. Your child will appreciate having a few friendly faces in the crowd on the first day of school. (The library is also a good default option for this kind of thing, since you’re sure to find local kids roaming the shelves for their summer reading.)

4. Make each school day special.

A new outfit, a shiny pair of shoes, a note in their backpack, a promise to visit the zoo after school one day—any small thing you can do to brighten up the day is worthwhile. Give your child something to look forward to, and they’re likely to be more positive about the day as a whole.

5. Provide opportunities.

Even though you might not be ready to open your home to guests just yet or you might be feeling overwhelmed trying to make friends of your own, try to provide opportunities for your kids to mingle. Allow them to invite someone over for a special dinner or participate in neighborhood rituals to encourage socialization.

6. Give them space and time.

In your desire to see your child comfortable and settled, you might push too hard or make them feel like they’re failing at making friends fast enough. Experts suggest that getting used to a new school can take up to six weeks for younger kids (longer for teenagers), so be patient. They’ll get there.

Above all else, be sure and listen to your child. Kids may need to talk through their anxiety or verbalize their frustrations, and constantly pushing them to accept the changes may only make the situation worse. Listen more than you talk and be sure to show your child all the love and attention they need during this difficult time.

Source:  NAVL

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