Transporting Trucks, Boats and Automobiles

Written by trishfms on . Posted in Be Prepared, Cross Country Moving Company, home owner, Insurance, logistics, move, mover, moving, moving advise, moving company, moving out of state, moving services, moving tips, moving to new state, nation wide mover, national moving company, north american van lines, professional mover, professional movers, professional moving company

auto transportAsk your Personal Relocation Consultant for options to transport cars, mini-vans, pickup trucks, boats and other vehicles to your new home by Florida Moving Systems (A North American Van Lines Agent) on an auto transport carrier or aboard the moving van.

Remember:

  • Automobiles should have one quarter or less fuel in the gas tank
  • Check automobiles for any oil, battery acid or radiator fluid leaks
  • Boats should be drained of all fuel and oil in the motor

IRS Help – Resources to Help You File Your Taxes

Written by trishfms on . Posted in Be Prepared, Estate Planning, home owner, Insurance, Parent, Taxes

        It’s Tax Time again!! To help you in the process we thought we’d share the IRS’s top resources.  Hope this helps! 2016-02-12     Free Resources:

Free Tax Return Preparation

Free Help To Resolve Tax Disputes

Paid Providers:

Directory of Federal Tax Return Preparers

Choosing a Paid Tax Professional

Types of Paid Tax Professional

Tax Professional Associations

Authorized e-File Providers

Prepare Your Own Taxes:  Free Resources

Free File

Pay Electronically

Commercial Software

E-file Option

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Written by trishfms on . Posted in Awareness, Be Prepared, healthy eating, healthy living, Insurance

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  BREAST CANCER AWARENESS:

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, which is an annual campaign to increase awareness of the disease. While most people are aware of breast cancer, many forget to take the steps to have a plan to detect the disease in its early stages and encourage others to do the same. We have made a lot of progress but still have a long way to go.  
 

Every person should know the symptoms and signs of breast cancer, and any time an abnormality is discovered, it should be investigated by a healthcare professional.

Most people who have breast cancer symptoms and signs will initially notice only one or two, and the presence of these symptoms and signs do not automatically mean that you have breast cancer.
 

By performing monthly breast self-exams, you will be able to more easily identify any changes in your breast.  Be sure to talk to your healthcare professional if you notice anything unusual.  (If you are not sure how to conduct a breast self-exam: GO HERE)
 

The best way to fight this is early detection!!

DID YOU KNOW:  MEN GET BREAST CANCER TOO!!! 

BCAM-newsletter-2This year, an estimated 2,360 men in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer. An estimated 430 men will die of breast cancer this year.

The five-year survival rate is the percentage of people who survive at least five years after the cancer is detected, excluding those who die from other diseases.
Breast cancer in men and women has similar survival rates. For the earliest stages of breast cancer, stages 0 and I, the five-year survival rate is 99%. Men with breast cancer that has spread to the local lymph nodes have an 84% five-year survival rate, and men with cancer that has spread to other parts of the body have a 24% five-year survival rate. Even if the cancer is found at a later stage, new treatments help many people with breast cancer maintain their quality of life for some period of time.

Age. The average age for men to be diagnosed with breast cancer is 65.
 

Regular self-examinations, clinical breast examinations performed by a doctor or other health care professional, and mammography are important ways to find breast cancer early, when it is easier to treat. Men should be familiar with the feel of their breast tissue, so they can talk with their doctor if they notice any lump or change. During an annual physical examination, your doctor will perform a clinical examination of the breast. Mammograms are not routinely offered to men and may be difficult to perform because of the small amount of breast tissue. A doctor may recommend regular mammography for men with a strong family history of breast cancer or for those with a genetic mutation that increases the risk of developing the disease.
 

Men with breast cancer may experience the following symptoms. Sometimes, men with breast cancer do not show any of these symptoms or signs. Or, these symptoms may be caused by a medical condition that is not cancer.

  • A lump or swelling in the breast tissue. Because men generally have small amounts of breast tissue, it is easier to feel small lumps.
  • Any new irregularity on the skin or nipple, such as redness, scaliness, puckering, or a discharge from the nipple
 

Maximum Value Protection | Protect Your Valuables

Written by trishfms on . Posted in Be Prepared, central florida moving, Cross Country Moving Company, home owner, Insurance, move, mover, moving, moving advise, moving company, Moving Estimate, moving out of state, moving services, moving tips, moving to new state, nation wide mover, national moving company, north american van lines, professional mover, professional movers, professional moving company

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Maximum Value Protection

At Florida Moving Systems, Inc, we’ll work closely with you to make sure every item we move is packed properly, transported safely and unloaded professionally.  In the rare event that one of your items is damaged while under our care, North American offers Maximum Value Protection (MVP).  MVP is a protection service that offers full replacement value or cost or repair if your household item is lost of damaged during the move, up to the dollar amount that you declare. 

How does MVP work?

You bought your armoire for $1600, and it weighs 150 lbs.  In an unusual circumstance, it is damaged beyond repair.  If you selected full MVP coverage, you are compensated for the full replacement value. *  If you selected the minimal basic coverage, your reimbursement is limited to 60 cents per pond of the item.  

Look at this comparison:

Maximum Value Protection Coverage             See the difference? Ask your Relocation Consultant to determine how much coverage is right for you. 

Pairs and Sets

MVP even covers matched pairs and sets such as lamps, candlesticks, end tables and dining room chairs.  if one of the pair or set gets damaged, and an exact replacement can’t be found, we will replace the set. *

Basic Liability Protection

There is no charge for Basic Liability Protection.  It provides repair or replacement up to a maximum of 60 cents per pound per article should your goods get damaged or lost.  But when it comes to protecting your belongings, one size does not fit all – the level of protection you need may be greater than the minimum coverage.  Consult your homeowner or renter’s insurance policy for recommended coverage levels or work with your Relocation Consultant to fill out an inventory worksheet together.  Be sure to consider high value items such as artwork, electronic equipment and valuable collectibles.

How to move your belongings with MVP

Just go to your Florida Moving Systems, Inc. Relocation Consultant to help you understand your coverage needs, determine your household’s total valuation, and answer any questions.

* See the terms and conditions specified on the North American Protection Plan Worksheet and North American’s published tariffs.  Complete replacement of multiple item sets of china, gold and silver flatware, and crystal glassware are excluded from pairs and sets protection under MVP Plan    

Hurricane Preparedness

Written by trishfms on . Posted in Be Prepared, central florida moving, Cross Country Moving Company, healthy living, home owner, Hurricane Prep, Insurance, north american van lines

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     WHAT is a Hurricane:  Hurricanes are massive storm systems that form over the water and move toward land. Threats from hurricanes include high winds, heavy rainfall, storm surge, coastal and inland flooding, rip currents, and tornadoes. These large storms are called typhoons in the North Pacific Ocean and cyclones in other parts of the world. The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale classifies hurricanes into five categories based on their wind speed, central pressure, and wind damage potential. With wind speeds of 111 miles per hour or more, Category 3, 4, and 5 hurricanes are major according to this scale. Category 1 and 2 hurricanes can also cause damage and injuries.

    WHEN does it happen:  The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 to November 30, with the peak occurring between mid-August and late October. The Eastern Pacific hurricane season begins May 15 and ends November 30.

    WHERE does it happen: Each year, many parts of the United States experience heavy rains, strong winds, floods, and coastal storm surges from tropical storms and hurricanes. Affected areas include all Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coastal areas, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Hawaii, parts of the Southwest, the Pacific Coast, and the U.S. territories in the Pacific.

PROTECT YOURSELF

EVACUATE Because hurricanes can be detected and tracked in advance of making landfall, residents in the storm’s path often get several days of advance notice. When a hurricane threatens your area, the best action to protect yourself and your family from the high winds and flooding caused by hurricanes is to evacuate when ordered to do so, before those conditions hit your area. Know and follow the directions from local officials for community evacuation or seek higher ground for localized flooding.   If you expect to go to a shelter after evacuating, download the American Red Cross Shelter Finder App at www.redcross.org/mobile-apps/shelter-finder-app.

REINFORCE FOR WIND, ELEVATE FOR WATER Your goal now, before a hurricane occurs, is to reduce the risk of damage to structures from winds and flooding. This includes strengthening the building’s outer shell—including the doors, windows, walls, and roof—and removing or securing all objects and non-building structures, as well as clearing the outside areas around the building. Measures to protect against potential flooding include waterproofing basements and elevating critical utilities (e.g., electrical panels and heating systems). In flood-prone areas, consider elevating the entire structure.

INSURANCE Purchasing flood insurance provides financial protection for the cost of repairs due to flood damage. Standard insurance policies do not cover flooding, including storm surge flooding, but flood insurance is available for homeowners, renters, and business owners through the National Flood Insurance Program. You may also be able to purchase insurance for wind.

STAY PREPARED

Store your supplies so you can grab them quickly if you need to evacuate; know in advance what else you will need to take. Take time now to make a list of the things you would need or want to take with you if you had to leave your home quickly. Store the basic emergency supplies in a “Go Bag” or other container. Be ready to grab other essential items quickly before leaving. Remember to include specialized items for people with disabilities and others with access and functional needs, such as older adults, children, and those with Limited English Proficiency.

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Here are some suggestions to consider: –

  • Prescription Medications
  • Flashlight and radio, either hand-cranked or battery-powered, with extra batteries
  • At least 1 gallon of water per person per day for at least 3 days. A normally active person needs about three-quarters of fluid daily, from water and other beverages. Water is also needed for food preparation and sanitation
  • At least a 3-day supply of non-perishable food for members of your household, including pet food and considerations for special dietary needs. Include a nonelectric can opener for canned food
  • First aid kit, medications, and medical supplies; and Battery backup power for power-dependent mobility devices, oxygen, and other assistive technology needs.
  • Sleeping bag or warm blanket for each person, if you live in a cold-weather climate.
  • Personal documents:  Birth Certificate, Passport… etc.
TO VIEW AND PRINT FULL PREPARATION GUIDE, CLICK HERE

SOURCE: http://www.fema.gov/media-library-data/1409003345844-0e142725ea3984938c8c6748dd1598cb/How_To_Prepare_Guide_Hurricane.pdf

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