Archive for August, 2015

Hurricane Preparedness

Written by trishfms on . Posted in Be Prepared, central florida moving, Cross Country Moving Company, healthy living, home owner, Hurricane Prep, Insurance, north american van lines

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     WHAT is a Hurricane:  Hurricanes are massive storm systems that form over the water and move toward land. Threats from hurricanes include high winds, heavy rainfall, storm surge, coastal and inland flooding, rip currents, and tornadoes. These large storms are called typhoons in the North Pacific Ocean and cyclones in other parts of the world. The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale classifies hurricanes into five categories based on their wind speed, central pressure, and wind damage potential. With wind speeds of 111 miles per hour or more, Category 3, 4, and 5 hurricanes are major according to this scale. Category 1 and 2 hurricanes can also cause damage and injuries.

    WHEN does it happen:  The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 to November 30, with the peak occurring between mid-August and late October. The Eastern Pacific hurricane season begins May 15 and ends November 30.

    WHERE does it happen: Each year, many parts of the United States experience heavy rains, strong winds, floods, and coastal storm surges from tropical storms and hurricanes. Affected areas include all Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coastal areas, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Hawaii, parts of the Southwest, the Pacific Coast, and the U.S. territories in the Pacific.

PROTECT YOURSELF

EVACUATE Because hurricanes can be detected and tracked in advance of making landfall, residents in the storm’s path often get several days of advance notice. When a hurricane threatens your area, the best action to protect yourself and your family from the high winds and flooding caused by hurricanes is to evacuate when ordered to do so, before those conditions hit your area. Know and follow the directions from local officials for community evacuation or seek higher ground for localized flooding.   If you expect to go to a shelter after evacuating, download the American Red Cross Shelter Finder App at www.redcross.org/mobile-apps/shelter-finder-app.

REINFORCE FOR WIND, ELEVATE FOR WATER Your goal now, before a hurricane occurs, is to reduce the risk of damage to structures from winds and flooding. This includes strengthening the building’s outer shell—including the doors, windows, walls, and roof—and removing or securing all objects and non-building structures, as well as clearing the outside areas around the building. Measures to protect against potential flooding include waterproofing basements and elevating critical utilities (e.g., electrical panels and heating systems). In flood-prone areas, consider elevating the entire structure.

INSURANCE Purchasing flood insurance provides financial protection for the cost of repairs due to flood damage. Standard insurance policies do not cover flooding, including storm surge flooding, but flood insurance is available for homeowners, renters, and business owners through the National Flood Insurance Program. You may also be able to purchase insurance for wind.

STAY PREPARED

Store your supplies so you can grab them quickly if you need to evacuate; know in advance what else you will need to take. Take time now to make a list of the things you would need or want to take with you if you had to leave your home quickly. Store the basic emergency supplies in a “Go Bag” or other container. Be ready to grab other essential items quickly before leaving. Remember to include specialized items for people with disabilities and others with access and functional needs, such as older adults, children, and those with Limited English Proficiency.

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Here are some suggestions to consider: –

  • Prescription Medications
  • Flashlight and radio, either hand-cranked or battery-powered, with extra batteries
  • At least 1 gallon of water per person per day for at least 3 days. A normally active person needs about three-quarters of fluid daily, from water and other beverages. Water is also needed for food preparation and sanitation
  • At least a 3-day supply of non-perishable food for members of your household, including pet food and considerations for special dietary needs. Include a nonelectric can opener for canned food
  • First aid kit, medications, and medical supplies; and Battery backup power for power-dependent mobility devices, oxygen, and other assistive technology needs.
  • Sleeping bag or warm blanket for each person, if you live in a cold-weather climate.
  • Personal documents:  Birth Certificate, Passport… etc.
TO VIEW AND PRINT FULL PREPARATION GUIDE, CLICK HERE

SOURCE: http://www.fema.gov/media-library-data/1409003345844-0e142725ea3984938c8c6748dd1598cb/How_To_Prepare_Guide_Hurricane.pdf

How Not To Lose Business During An Office Move

Written by trishfms on . Posted in central florida moving, logistics, move, mover, moving, moving advise, moving company, moving services, moving tips, nation wide mover, national moving company, north american van lines, packing, professional mover, professional movers, professional moving company, storage

Fl-Move-Slider3   When it comes to moving your business, it can seem like an inevitability that you will face down time, unavailable hours and lost business. Transitioning from one office or professional space to another is most certainly no easy task—coordinating the logistics of computers and phones, to office furniture and equipment can initially seem next to impossible.

However, moving your business successfully doesn’t have to include a marathon session of headaches! Planning your office transition effectively can provide a stress-free and optimistic experience.

  Coordinate

A large part of preparing your office for the incoming rush will be to communicate the upcoming move as effectively as possible—after all, what better way to utilize the talents of your team than to involve them directly in the process of their own transition?

Advising every team and department on the logistics of the move will prove an effective way to allow them to coordinate their own projects, equipment, and packing of personal things to ensure that the overall move is delegated seamlessly and fluidly.

  Cover all the Bases

Ensuring that you review the details of your move and opt for the most effective moving package can prevent a lot of undue logistical confusion. While personal moves will largely come down to which services and perks appeal to your personal preference, moving an office is no easy task for anyone, and can benefit highly from full-service or similar plans. You won’t want to be personally lugging desks and PC towers into a truck on a Wednesday morning, and your customers won’t want to wait around the extra time either!

Let Clients Know

Communication will prove to be key when dealing with a professional transition—be sure to reach out to any regular clients or customers in advance and make them aware of the fact that you’ll be undergoing a change in location.

Planning around a disruption in communication for 1-2 days can prove invaluable in not only keeping your current clients happy, but maintaining long-term client relationships as well. If your clientele is made aware of a shift in schedule, you’ll be much less likely to lose potential business by people being frustrated at the inability to get in touch.

Prep your New Location

If you plan on hitting the ground running in your new office space, you can have a productive, albeit rough, first day. Confirm the working order of telephone and electrical wiring, in addition to ensuring your internet connections are ready to go.

Consider setting up a handful of preliminary, temporary workspaces featuring a communal phone or computer, so that your team can hop on with high-importance clients and keep things running smoothly during the hectic transition.

Source:  NAVL Blog

How to stay healthy with back to school germs

Written by trishfms on . Posted in healthy eating, healthy living, home owner, Kids, New School, Parent

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It’s Back To School Time… which means GERM Season is back!

Yes, end of Summer is here, which means settling back into the comfortable routine of days marked by the ringing of school bells. It also means cold and flu season lurking just around the corner. Every parent dreads their child getting sick when school starts, even if it’s “just” a cold.

At best, you have a child not feeling well, not eating or sleeping well-a child missing school and parents missing work. At worst, a cold occasionally develops into something more, requiring a visit to the doctor and medical attention. What’s an overworked, sleep-deprived parent to do? Especially if they can’t afford to miss work? Well, here are some facts and practical tips to help keep your family healthy this cold and flu season.

Colds and flu are caused by viruses, not bacteria. Viruses are one type of germ that infects cells and makes us ill. Here are some common illnesses from viruses:

  • Head cold: Many colds are caused by rhinoviruses. Rhino means nose in Greek, so these are viruses that infect the nose. We get runny and stuffy noses when we have colds because that is where the virus is setting up shop.
  • Stomach flu: Rhinoviruses are actually one of a group of viruses called enteroviruses. Entero means intestine in Greek. These viruses infect our gastrointestinal tract, causing sore throat, nausea, vomiting or diarrhea-an illness some people call the stomach flu.
  • Influenza: A stomach “bug” is different from the actual flu, which is caused by the influenza virus. Influenza comes from the Italian word for influence of the stars. In medieval Europe, people thought outbreaks of colds and flu were caused by the movement of the stars.
Unlike bacterial infections, which can be treated with antibiotics, there are no medicines we can take to kill the viruses that cause colds and flu. We have to rely on our immune systems to do that job for us.

Avoiding Infection:

  • Hand Washing frequently with soap and water-and always before eating, after using the restroom and after being in a public place. Regular soap is fine; antibacterial soap isn’t necessary because colds are caused by viruses not bacteria.
  • Avoid sharing food, drinks, utensils, washcloths, toys, etc.
  • Cough or sneeze in a tissue or the crook of the elbow instead of the bare hand.
  • It is recommend if a child has a fever they can return to school 24 hours after fever has broken. Please do not send your child to school with a fever.
  • Give your child a box of tissue to keep in their desk/cubby as well as keep a box of tissue at your desk.
  • Use Hand Sanitizer
Cold and flu viruses are not airborne. You can’t catch a cold just by being in the same room as someone who’s sick.

To read the whole article:  CLICK HERE